Messages du forum par Polyvios Animations

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  • #29321

    Hello and good evening, and welcome back, and how do you do?

    When I was first starting out with drawing practice, I'd done some one-on-one art instruction, then thru the Salem YMCA's art program back from 2003-2006, then later did some drawing practice from how-to-draw books, where my first attempts were a bit too stiff, but that didn't matter at the time, because I thought I could only practice the drawing once, yet it took me longer to figure out how to get better at drawing loosely. So then, later on, attended an art class at the Salem High School art department, where I'd really got back on the wheel in gesture drawing since the YMCA, but that was when I'd learned how to use a timer for quick sketches. One was for one minute per pose. Felt a bit of pressure, but I'd gotten thru it. Furthermore, it still took me a bit longer to know that I had to get movement working in my lines, yet all that changed when I'd websurfed on some online drawing tools on this Internet.

    Sorry if I'd gotten a bit all over the map on my explanation, so to make a long story short, I'd truly gotten better at my loosest and lightest touch with my sketches and drawings, especally for my art, cartoons, and animations. But that's not all, I've gotten a link of some samples for my Drive, if you don't mind. HERE!

    To answer your question, to start with, in order to maintain your guts, you'd have to start with the guts of your drawings, in other words, gestures, forces, or whatever you wanna call them. To further illustrate this communication, here's a link to John Kricfalusi's(Spumco, Ren and Stimpy) older blog with a tag on here, here, aaand here! Though whether or not he knows it, but the only great way to push your guts in your sketches or pictures, is that you should use the reference, not copy it in fear of loosing the sparks of life and vitality. Please don't read too much into his attitude on gesture drawing, but it's OK if you can just bookmark, add to reading list, download and study and warm up the videos and images on John's oldest, greatest blog. Please take what I've suggested and these things with the really smallest grain of salt.

    #29315

    Greatest works on your loosest and most totally dynamic facial forms. Please keep up the greatest works!

    Still, I'm not getting enough of the fastness and the most loosest and lightest lines in your poses of faces. How would you kindly love to do 1 hour of 30 second expression attitudes, using your underhand position?(120 facial sketches, with a 5 minute break towards the end of the session) As a result, before your start some of the most realistically complex forms of the faces, mind if we suggest doing the strongest strokes of your facial lines of movement, so that way, you'd be able to go with the flow in terms of your facial storytelling expressions. For even really most details, then I'd suggest this video down below.👇

    This one is about how you would and should start out with the loosest abstract pass with anything, especially faces.

    'Hope this helps.

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    #29313

    Good evening, Syd-O, and welcome aboard, and OK, your looser poses are absolutely, positively are all on the righter-tighter track in getting exaggeration and expression in your graphic mark-making. Please keep those things going!

    Still, those lines of action, balance, rhythm, and tempo could use a bit far more distortion and exaggeration. How would you like to push the lines a lot more faster, looser, lighter, and free-er with 30 minutes of 29 second quicker figure pictures? As a result, your quicker doodles and drawings will be the most boiled down and distilled in terms of the organic pictures and flow. It's OK if your lines are a lot more messier and shakier, because, you'll loose those things with even more time, practice, and progress. For more and even more details, be sure to look into some Classic Cartoon animators reels on YouTube for most inspiration for studying the mechanics and performance combined. But the point is, we're all learning about the quick sketching techniques for animators, cartoonists, and artists alike.

    My hat's off to you, and let's hope these have been absolutely, positively, and totally helpful and informative! ;)

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    #29299

    Thanks for the first batch, Chloé, but could and would you please give us permission on the last three? Thanks and have a swell time.

    #29290

    Good evening, Shyandkawaii, and welcome aboard, and I'm Polyvios, and how are you doing tonight? So, I've looked at, duped, rotated, flipped, grayscaled, and saturated your drawings up for me, and it seems that all of your quick sketches are all fluid, organic, solid and far more appealing to me in their own ways. Very good job, and please keep going on your first and latest attempts.

    If I'm pressed to pick one detail, I'd say that your quick poses don't look or seem flowing and pliable enough to me, especially in those quicker sketches for 30s-1 minute. How would you kindly like to work your pencils in an underhanded position with 30 minutes of 2 minute quick poses, while beginnning with the lightest and loosest lines as possible? As a result, your poses and forms and shapes will become the least mechanical and the most dynamic, spontaneous and alive in your acting drawings that tell the story, visually. If your aspirations to get in comics and art in general, then I'd like to recommend, or suggest, Understanding Comics by Scott McCloud and the PDF of Fun with a Pencil by Andrew L. Reasons: Drawing and storytelling fundamentals, and the Andrew Loomis book, the basic drawing fundamentals or ideas. Now keep in mind that some of the images, though they are all uniquely appealing, they seem to be from a different era. So please take this suggestion with the really smallest grain of salt, by clicking here!

    Good luck to you and your developing learning curve

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    #29277

    Good evening, Amarin Reyny, and welcome back, and greatest job on your comic book realism- and your chibi-style sketches, but it's OK to be taking a break from drawing for two years because of your medical condition, which I wouldn't get into too much. Great work on your first attempts in two years. Please keep moving forward in hour drawing myelin sheaths.

    Yet still, I'm not getting enough of that funniest grotesquerie in your gesturally graphic lines or shapes. How would you kindly free up your observation and caricature with 5 minutes of 30 second poses and faces and expressions? The reason is because, it's a skill that you could and would and should develop for several years or so, if you can. And furthermore, your drawings and cartoons will become less stiffer and the most dynamic, vital and full of energy. And if your wanna know some more, be sure to look into the Betty Edwards books, like Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain, and Drawing on the Artist Within. Look into the text and illustrations and do some 1 minute warm-up doodles in gesture form and blind contour form, too. Not to mention the section on the upside down drawing exercise, which emphasizes emphatically the concept, which some people find a bit dated, on the L-Mode and R-Mode. More on another commment.

    Good night, and good luck and great health on you and your march of progress.

    #29273

    Looking forward to those, too.

    #29257

    Good morning, Brho, and welcome back to Line of Action, and I'm Polyvios and how are you doing tonight? Greater, greater, and even more greater job on how organic your spaces and forms are. Those are very greater!

    However, these poses that I've seen so far aren't getting enough of that expressive exaggeration on those lines of action on all of your nudes. How would you please loosen up your lines of action and rhythm with 1 hour of 1 minute attitudes, using the horizontal flip?

    Explanation: as a result, your marks and poses will be the most expressive and emotional in your storytelling context. The way the artist sees things is that he/she/they can cartoon reality, not extremely copy it. Good luck to your learning curve and your march of progress.

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    #29252

    Good evening, WEREWOKE, and welcome to Line of Action. How are you doing tonight? I think that you're doing a far greater job on mostly your mark-making, but your anatomy is spot-on, yet of course, your silhouettes. Keep going at all of those things!

    But however, those baby fat areas in the torso, where the bones and muscles lie, I'm not completely getting enough of that squash-and-stretch look and feel to them, in what you can and how you can exaggerate in that contrapposto pose. How would you like to free up your hands, elbows, and shoulders with 15 minutes of 5 minutes of poses and attitudes? (all flipped vertical) If you do this drawing exercise, you'll take away two things: First of all, is that you can see the organic shapes, lines, spaces, or forms using your right side of the brain. And second, you can make your mark-making and silhouettes a lot less rigid and a lot most dynamic, appealing, and lively in your knowledge of drawing gestures and anatomy.(Even if you'd just scribble them all out)

    Please kindly take all these things with a really smallest grain of salt, and let's hope they've helped and benefited you.

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    #29247

    Good afternoon, Ahugh, and welcome aboard, and how are you doing today? So, if you're saying that you can learn how to draw people, then you're on the right track. And to answer your question, I'd suggest, that in order to draw realistic people more fluidly and lively, then I'd recommend you do, like, 5 minutes of 30 second quick poses, so that you couldn't get too bogged down on the more complicated forms and details.

    The reason is that in gesture drawing, it's not only great, but totally important to focus your attention on drawing the spirit of the attitudes; heck, even your realistic drawings would and should benefit from this thing. For most details, look into some Frank Frazetta art, some Gil Elvgren pinups, some Jack Kirby comic sketches, and some 2 PDFs of the Walt Stanchfields. BUT WAIT, THERE'S MORE! As an added bonus, I'd like to have you try out the online drawing tutorial here on our site.

    Kindly take these with a really smaller grain of salt, and hope they've been helpful.

    #29244

    Nicest job on getting your lightest touch in your mark-making, but they look a bit too faintest to me, personally. How would you like to work more loosely with your non-dominant hand with 30 minutes of 2 minute quick poses, using your ballpoint pens? The reason is totally because, your lines will be the boldest, clearest, strongest and loosest in your posing and attitudes.

    Good luck to you, and good night to you.

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    #29240

    Good morning, Zenlaeth, and great work on your range of gestures, silhouettes, and relationships and forms of your faces and figures. Way to go and keep going and keep trying real hard. I appreciate your goal to dissociate yourself from the dreaded same-face-syndrome. I think that it can make your facial expressions more rigider and less human and less in sync with how your character thinks and feels in any given situation.

    When it comes to a criticism or two, constructive at that, I feel that these faces and expressions don't seem sufficiently cartooniest and humanest enough to me. How would you kindly free up your dominant and non-dominant hands with 30 mins of 30 second blind gesture drawings of expressions and mugs? (120 scribbles done blindly)

    Because if you can do this, then most of your faces and expressions will become the most exaggerated and spontaneous in your acting choices. For most all info, please look into this video down below, or two or more.

    In addition, in real life, not all faces are exactly the same on either side, even though some faces are more or less the same and/or different than others, except, as a bonus, here's this link right here.

    Kindly take these thingies with the smallest grain of salt of all, and good night. Go back to sleep.

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    #29236

    Hello, Amarin Reyny, and welcome aboard. How are you doing tonight? To answer your question, in order to sketch out your facial emotions with a lot of observation and caricature, then you really need to capture the lines of action and acting of the expressions with lots of quicker gesture drawings, using your elbow. As a result, your ruff sketches will be the least stiffer and the most connected to your characters' internal thoughts and feelings related to your idea/gag. For furthest info, look up Understanding Comics by Scott McCloud, though I haven't owned a copy yet.

    Kindly take this suggestion with a grain of salt, so hope this has been completely and absolutely supportive and encouraging.

    #29235

    You know, everybody, if I'm pressed to pick one, not one, but two, I'd say Glenn Vilppu and Walt Stanchfield/Don Hahn. The reason why is because of their totally unique approaches to gesture drawing and how very applicable their methods can be for animation and cartooning.

    Here are the links:

    Vilppu Drawing Manual

    Drawn to Life 1

    and Drawn to Life 2

    These links can be clicked to these titles. Hope these have all been positively nicer and helpful

    #29224

    Good evening, Eliciden, and welcome aboard. How are you doing this evening?

    Greatest job on showing of your range of silhouettes, interior negatives, and action in drawings. Way to go, and kindly keep up your greatest jobs.

    However, I'm not getting enough of your lightest lines where you would kiss the paper, or tablet, at your softest. How would you like to free up your longest and loosest lines with 31 minutes of 1 minute scribbles? (31 scribbles)

    Please don't do this exercise because I suggested you or for any reason, do it because it can make your personality the least stiffest and the most spontaneous, liveliest, and intrinsically motivated in terms of your storytelling and acting sketches for art, cartooning, illustration, and animation.

    "Learn how to think like an artist."

    Stephen Worth

    For most inspiration, look into the Daniel Coyle book on talent, then get the Betty Edwards books on Drawing the Artist Within, and the Right Side of the Brain. Next, get Fun with a Pencil by Loomis. Kindly take these things with the really smallest grain of salt, and we all hope they could help you out by the longest shot.