Why some people don't recommend using the manneqiun to draw?

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This topic contains 5 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by Gabbothefox 1 week ago.

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  • #32013

    I have seen some lessons or lectures from a challenge I had. While I'm learning, the guy mentioned that there are some issues when you do the poses from a wooden mannequin because the limbs and their angles, which I disagree. Instead, they suggested using a 2D one in order to mimmic the poses from the photo references.

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    #32014

    Those wooden mannequins can be a useful tool in certain circumstances, but in many other circumstances the limitations of wood not being able to convey human anatomy of how muscles move the skeleton, ligaments, fat, organs, etc around can absolutely lead to issues with drawing convincing or dynamic people.

    As with any tool, they have their place, but probably shouldn't be the only tool in your toolbox.

    You have said you disagree but give no reasons why.

    #32019

    Well, Kim, the reason why Gabbo disagrees with this sentiment is, I think, because is the rigidity of the rudimentary and basic nature of the simplest but most geometric forms of the mannequin figure, unless you're really want to apply and really need to apply contour and gesture drawing to establish the lines of action, balance and rhythm to give the basic forms the most organic flow. I love to draw from the mannequins with gesture sketching and contour drawings, but I don't want them to be the only way of thinking of drawing the figures from life.

    My hat's off to you.

    #32021

    I mean, yes, redoing every pose with a mannequin is awkward and time consuming, and some poses you will never be able to accurately copy with it.

    The mannequin is a nice toy, that can very effectively introduce a beginner to a certain type of simplification of the form. I feel it has an in-built expiry date. You buy it, you use it a few dozen times or so, you get the message, you gradually stop using it. In the end it mostly stands around on the desk or a shelf, until every now and then you really struggle with a specific problem of foreshortening, and take your chance of maybe triggering your brain better with the mannequin.

    Given that a mannequin isn't crazy expensive, I think it's fair to have one, even if you won't be using it forever or very often.

    What I don't see is how a 2-D set of shapes would do a better job than a mannequin. They will just be even more constrictive in their use cases, and they won't even look decorative on the shelf.

    #32081

    is the rigidity of the rudimentary and basic nature of the simplest but most geometric forms of the mannequin figure, unless you're really want to apply and really need to apply contour and gesture drawing to establish the lines of action

    This!

    I always want to have a mannequin for drawing the poses. But there are digital toos to mimic and put details in teh drawing.

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